Would You Rather…?

Note: The entire concept for this post comes from www.maneandchic.com who covered it in their ” Would You Rather Have A Big Library or Big TV” post

While browsing one of my new favorite blogs, Mane and Chic, the question, “Would You Rather Have A Big Library or Big TV?” came up.  Immediately I sided with a big library.  While I do dedicate quite a large amount of my time to reality television, there’s no denying that books are my first love.  As a child I was known to spend hours in the library, browsing their selections until I had amassed a pile of 10+ books that I checked out, read and returned.  I spent hours reading.  As an adult, I am now known to spend random weekend hours curled up in bed with my newest purchases from Barnes & Noble.  Nothing will ever get me the way that books do, television included.  As a result, when I finally moved into my own place, I refused to place a tv in my bedroom.  My tv’s could be found in my second bedroom and living room-my bedroom was reserved exclusively for writing, reading and sleeping. 

The author of mane and chic elaborated that more affluent households have fewer televisions than than the homes of poorer communities.  Generally, the more money one had, the more books that could be found in that home.  Wow.  Think about that for a second and the implications it has…

After reading that, I logged into my ebookstore and ordered two more books for my Sony e-Reader lol!  Below I’ve found a few pictures of unique bookcases and a library that have tickled my fancy.  Enjoy 🙂

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7 thoughts on “Would You Rather…?

  1. Thank God, I am a reader and chose the library! I would have hated dealing with choosing the television and having to reflect through my choice….

    Diggame, awesome point. We are definitely on the same page.

    • Couso I am so envious of your living room bookshelf…it contains everything I pray that mine will one day.

      It’s so interesting I came across this post when I did because my mother just finished telling me about how on my next tax refund I should invest several hundred into a nice, new thin HDTV. After learning about books vs tv, I think I’ll keep my big, box tv and instead invest all that money into my personal library and a nice bookshelf.

  2. “The author of mane and chic elaborated that more affluent households have fewer televisions than than the homes of poorer communities. Generally, the more money one had, the more books that could be found in that home.”

    This is an interesting statement because there is a study that says children that grow up in homes with more books are more likely too succeed to those that do not have any books. One would think the direct correlation here is the kid with the books is smarter because they read more and therefore more successful then kid without books.

    Wrong.

    Turns out the kids with the books in the home typically live in a household where the parents are very successful and more affluent then their non-book counterparts and therefore more likely to adopt their parents traits of success and the parents provide them with superior resources to lead to a higher probability of success. It actually has nothing to do with reading any of the books in the house. The kid with books in the home has a greater shot of doing well without reading a single book in that household then a kid from a lower socieoeconomic background (see: poor) even if that kid reads books.

    For those interested I’m referencing a chapter in the popular book “Freakonomics” by Stephen Dunbar and Steven Levitt. It’s a good read 🙂

    • I’m gonna have to read that book Larry…but I would then counter…couldn’t one say that “books/reading” are character traits of success? I don’t know of any successful people who are opposed to reading. Part of being privy of superior resources extends beyond word-of-mouth and ultimately leads one to reading different books, reviews, examples, etc of the world.

      As general as this statement is, I believe if Black people read more we would achieve more. Prime example. Growing up, I spent all my time in nice, public schools or private schools where reading was shoved down our throats. As a result I grew to love it and read everything in sight. In 8th grade I was jerked out of that system and moved to the poor, public school system that was in academic emergency-we were the WORST school district in Ohio and while I was touted as being the “nerd” and so “smart” the only difference was the fact that I was a reader and they were not. From 8th-12th grade I noticed that many of my classmates were just as engaged in class as I was, would score similarly on tests in class, etc but when it came time for state administered tests, ACTs, etc I always outscored the majority of them by a landslide and I believe my voracious reading was the only reason why.

  3. “…couldn’t one say that “books/reading” are character traits of success? I don’t know of any successful people who are opposed to reading. ”

    Yeah, you’re absolutely correct. The context in which the study is given that I referenced above was more specifically books that are physically in the household. Just because the kid in that household didn’t read the books there it didn’t mean they didn’t read anywhere else.

    The character traits that are passed down to the children from parents that have books in the household will be ones that will help the child succeed. Mainly because said parents are well-educated/academics, etc…

    I had a similar experience as far as going from a higher tier educational system to one with um…say lower expectations. So I feel you there.

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